Buddhism, Guided Meditation, Society, Spirituality

Episode 53: Guided Vajrayana Medicine Buddha Meditation


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I remember, not too long ago, I fell ill with a fever and a raging temperature that ruined my good mood and imprisoned me with fear. The next morning, early, I was supposed to catch a flight to Portugal to find a plot of land after a deposit we put down on another plot fell through; time was ticking, and if I didn’t go on, my family would miss their chance to move from London. The fever started at 6pm. I began to chant at 7pm. My flight was at 10am. What would happen next?

“Tayatha Om Bekandze Bekandze Maha Bekandze Radza Samudgate Soha.”

Weeping for nothing, because I felt like a thunderbolt had ripped me apart, deep sleep overtook me and regeneration happened overnight. In the morning, no sign of a fever was on my forehead and my body felt replenished and neutral. This was nothing short of a miracle – usually it would take three or more days for a fever brought on by a viral infection to lift, but it was gone as if the previous night never existed. Such is the power of the “Bhaiśajyaguru” or Medicine Buddha Mantra.

So who is this mysterious Medicine Buddha? He is another Buddha, like Shakyamuni, whom even Shakyamuni confirms will come to fulfil his vows upon enlightenment, that heals the sick, lame, and otherwise unhealthy or unfortunate. This mantra, and meditations on the Medicine Buddha, have been long practiced by Japanese, Chinese, and Tibetan Buddhists.

The meditation I give in this episode is a Tantric/Vajrayana visualisation that will become more clear and realistic the more you listen and practice. Vajrayana meditation aims to merge the Buddha or deity (such as Green Tara) with the mediator so that supreme qualities are eventually obtained without effort.

Relax, enjoy, and get ready to use your best imagination!

 

Hinduism / Sanatana Dharma, Interview, Society, Spirituality

Episode 36: Vedic Living — Interview with Akshay Kanade

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Krishna & The Cow

“Veda”

means “knowledge” and

“Sanatana Dharma”

is a more accurate term for “Hinduism”. Why? “Hinduism” was a colonial term given to ‘those living near the Indus River’, and, as another point of gentle contention — there is not a real basis for the Aryan invasion or civilisation, so that is most likely based on colonialism, too. (However, we still use it in our episode, as it’s a familiar term and also is still embraced by many). But, for the record…

“Sanatana”

means “eternal”

and “Dharma”

means “natural way”.

Thus, Hinduism is not a religion nor even the best terminology to use. Anybody, regardless of race, class, caste, career, gender, or global location on the map can follow the “eternal, natural way”! Lao Tzu also wrote the Tao Te Ching, which is indeed the “eternal, natural way”. Buddha also found the “eternal, natural way” and taught it for 40+ years. So there is a harmony amongst all dualistic so-called divisions that simply seek to emanate the same message, brought forth through different languages and cultures and times.

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Akshay Kanade was born in India and now lives in New York City. How can a man working on Wall Street live in tune with the Vedic mind, body, and spirit? This seems quite tricky from my point-of-view, as a modern woman living in London! It is said that the main attributes that use up Prana the quickest are forcefulness and speaking. Ask anybody living in the city how gentle they are to themselves and to others, with actions, speech, and mind. It’s commendable that we can still live this way in 2019. Akshay talks with me about his ventures with Sanatana Dharma and shares the breadth of his knowledge with us.

According to Akshay:

“Hinduism proclaims about the fundamental human values, elevated human virtues and we have observed that all Indian saints are the living embodiments of these values and virtues. Hinduism teaches all eight-fold manifestations of a culture such as:

-Dharma (moral conduct and self-realization)

 

-Politics and History

-Economics

-Sociology

-Classical literature

-Science and Technology

-Sports and Performing Arts

-Education”

In our episode, we talk about the four main goals of living Sanatana Dharma:

Dharma – hard to translated directly, but is can be said: as living a moral life with duty; doing what one is supposed/meant to do with dilligence. It upholds both the individuals in society and the entire universal cosmos.
Artha – economic and material well-being as a baseline for every human being
Kama – wishes or passions of the senses
Moksha – liberation from the cycle of birth and death

This ties nicely into the Dharmic literature, as a whole, being a basis for human living. They are considered “Apaurusheya” or “authorless”. The literature fits into either of these two categories:

Shruti – “Heard” or “Perceived as an eternal sound” and written down immediately once heard

Shruti literature includes The four Vedas – Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda, and Atharvaveda; Upanishads; Brahmanas; and Aranyakas

Smriti – “Remembered” or passed down through a disciplic succession and eventually written down

Smriti literature includes: The Mahabharata; Ramayana; The Puranas; Sutras; Panchararatras; Dharma Shastras; and more

Akshay says:

“Hinduism is one of the most ancient, comprehensive and most wonderful philanthropic way of living. Hinduism talks about ‘Shruti’ (Vedas), ‘Smiriti’ (text of laws) and ‘Puranas’ (history of the country.) The Puranas such as Ramayan and Mahabharat with Lord Ram and Lord Krishna respectively is the history of India. Which a lot of scholars have started to believe in recent years.”

Within the Vedas lie texts on Ayurveda, or the science of keeping the body in good health and balance. Ayurveda is still being refined until today and encompasses: regulating diet, meditation and psychiatry, admistering correct medicines, massages, and advice on personal lifestyle/habits.

Akshay and I even touch on whether or not the gods, goddesses, and historical figures in the Dharmic literature were real figures. History is always up for debate, so, you can decide; yet Akshay gives compelling evidence that Lord Ram, for example, was indeed real based on archaeological evidence.

Another amazing doctor he mentions is Dr. R N Shukla from Pune, India, who works with Resonant Frequency Imaging (RFI) to record various effects on the human body and mind. As Akshay mentioned, he also caught the vibration of the Gita when it was spoken so many thousands of years ago!

Without giving too much away, please listen to our episode! If you can be so kind as to leave a review on iTunes, this would really help our show move forward.

“The greatest prayer said on this planet:

 सर्वे भवन्तु सुखिनः
सर्वे सन्तु निरामयाः ।
सर्वे भद्राणि पश्यन्तु
मा कश्चिद्दुःखभाग्भवेत् ।
 शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः ॥

Om Sarve Bhavantu Sukhinah
Sarve Santu Niraamayaah |
Sarve Bhadraanni Pashyantu
Maa Kashcid-Duhkha-Bhaag-Bhavet |
Om Shaantih Shaantih Shaantih ||”
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*Akshay has innumerable resources available for Vedic living and Dharmic learning, so please get in touch with him on LinkedIn.