Buddhism, Guided Meditation, Society, Spirituality

Episode 53: Guided Vajrayana Medicine Buddha Meditation


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I remember, not too long ago, I fell ill with a fever and a raging temperature that ruined my good mood and imprisoned me with fear. The next morning, early, I was supposed to catch a flight to Portugal to find a plot of land after a deposit we put down on another plot fell through; time was ticking, and if I didn’t go on, my family would miss their chance to move from London. The fever started at 6pm. I began to chant at 7pm. My flight was at 10am. What would happen next?

“Tayatha Om Bekandze Bekandze Maha Bekandze Radza Samudgate Soha.”

Weeping for nothing, because I felt like a thunderbolt had ripped me apart, deep sleep overtook me and regeneration happened overnight. In the morning, no sign of a fever was on my forehead and my body felt replenished and neutral. This was nothing short of a miracle – usually it would take three or more days for a fever brought on by a viral infection to lift, but it was gone as if the previous night never existed. Such is the power of the “Bhaiśajyaguru” or Medicine Buddha Mantra.

So who is this mysterious Medicine Buddha? He is another Buddha, like Shakyamuni, whom even Shakyamuni confirms will come to fulfil his vows upon enlightenment, that heals the sick, lame, and otherwise unhealthy or unfortunate. This mantra, and meditations on the Medicine Buddha, have been long practiced by Japanese, Chinese, and Tibetan Buddhists.

The meditation I give in this episode is a Tantric/Vajrayana visualisation that will become more clear and realistic the more you listen and practice. Vajrayana meditation aims to merge the Buddha or deity (such as Green Tara) with the mediator so that supreme qualities are eventually obtained without effort.

Relax, enjoy, and get ready to use your best imagination!

 

Buddhism, Death & Rebirth, Guided Meditation, Hinduism / Sanatana Dharma, Philosophy, Society, Spirituality

Episode 24: Gentle Guided Meditation on Death


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What does death feel like? Surely, no one of us knows: but we have our imaginations to help us find out.

One of the four noble truths is that life is suffering (or dukkha), if it is taken wrongly. Almost all of us have a wrong view of both life and death, because they are mostly left unexplored due to intillectual fear. Liberation from fear can be achieved either slowly along a Buddhist path or rather quickly, as in the case of Pratyekabuddhas (or lone Buddhas) who awaken spontaneously and without effort. With a little patience and perseverance, awakening can be achieved, including the reminder that life is fragile, will end for all of us, and no one is immune to Samsara.

Along with the four noble truths, another truth that we can see very clearly is that all beings who ever have lived and who ever will live, will pass away. This can be explored before the big annhilation if we choose — and it is very healthy to ponder, contemplate, and wonder about truth. We don’t need excuses as to why “we shouldn’t look at that” or “we shouldn’t talk about that” or even “we shouldn’t think about that“.

If it is an experience of the human kingdom, either psychologically or societally, then it is fair playing ground to explore.

Depression has been explored… anxiety and a whole host of mental ailments are being explored… the expansion of consciousness through entheogenic plant medicines is explored… sexuality… personal identity… climbing the highest mountains and looking through the deepest jungles… so why not explore our own deaths along the way?

Often our deepest fears are rooted in habitual tendencies linked to negative experiences in the past or the unknown and intangible future.

Let’s explore these together, if they come up, in this gentle guided meditation on death.

May all beings be happy; may all beings be free from suffering. May all beings be peaceful; may all beings be free!

With love and gratitude for my life and yours,
Jnana B

Buddhism, Guided Meditation, Hinduism / Sanatana Dharma, Society, Spirituality

Episode 23: Just Walk! A Guided Meditation

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Busy or not… we can all meditate!

Walking meditation has a long tradition, and it isn’t something I just made up right now on the spot — and I thoroughly enjoy this practice, living in a busy city. Walking meditation has always been common in Zen Buddhism and throughout India, with a plethora of practitioners of different religious / spiritual / and traditional backgrounds. It is used to break up long bouts of sitting practice, known as Zazen, or as a practice on its own.

Wildmind Meditation explains it particularly well:

”Anything we do can become meditative, including eating, driving, washing, cleaning the house, and of course, walking. Historically, Buddhist monks in India would make walking an important part of their daily practice, remaining mindful as they walked around performing the daily tasks of life such as fetching water or going to the bathroom, as well as when on the alms round as they begged for food by going from door to door, and as they simply walked from one place to another as they crossed the country. It was natural for them to make the simple act of walking into an opportunity to develop mindfulness and lovingkindness.”

Since everything can be a meditation, theoretically, then we can also turn the simple act of walking from place to place or setting the intention to do this into our days. It becomes very pleasureable just to walk and notice bodily sensations, getting used to being back in our bodies when often our minds are overwhelmed.

Try this method with me and tell me how it goes!