Buddhism, Death & Rebirth, Society, Spirituality

Episode 44: Satta Sutta — A Being


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I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi at Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. Then Ven. Radha went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: “‘A being,’ lord. ‘A being,’ it’s said. To what extent is one said to be ‘a being’?”

“Any desire, passion, delight, or craving for form, Radha: when one is caught up[1] there, tied up[2] there, one is said to be ‘a being.’[3]

“Any desire, passion, delight, or craving for feeling… perception… fabrications…

“Any desire, passion, delight, or craving for consciousness, Radha: when one is caught up there, tied up there, one is said to be ‘a being.’

“Just as when boys or girls are playing with little sand castles:[4] as long as they are not free from passion, desire, love, thirst, fever, & craving for those little sand castles, that’s how long they have fun with those sand castles, enjoy them, treasure them, feel possessive of them. But when they become free from passion, desire, love, thirst, fever, & craving for those little sand castles, then they smash them, scatter them, demolish them with their hands or feet and make them unfit for play.

“In the same way, Radha, you too should smash, scatter, & demolish form, and make it unfit for play. Practice for the ending of craving for form.

“You should smash, scatter, & demolish feeling, and make it unfit for play. Practice for the ending of craving for feeling.

“You should smash, scatter, & demolish perception, and make it unfit for play. Practice for the ending of craving for perception.

“You should smash, scatter, & demolish fabrications, and make them unfit for play. Practice for the ending of craving for fabrications.

“You should smash, scatter, & demolish consciousness and make it unfit for play. Practice for the ending of craving for consciousness — for the ending of craving, Radha, is Unbinding.”

Courtesy of Access to Insight

Buddhism, Death & Rebirth, Philosophy, Society, Spirituality

Episode 43: Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta — Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion


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I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Varanasi in the Game Refuge at Isipatana. There he addressed the group of five monks:

“There are these two extremes that are not to be indulged in by one who has gone forth. Which two? That which is devoted to sensual pleasure with reference to sensual objects: base, vulgar, common, ignoble, unprofitable; and that which is devoted to self-affliction: painful, ignoble, unprofitable. Avoiding both of these extremes, the middle way realized by the Tathagata — producing vision, producing knowledge — leads to calm, to direct knowledge, to self-awakening, to Unbinding.

“And what is the middle way realized by the Tathagata that — producing vision, producing knowledge — leads to calm, to direct knowledge, to self-awakening, to Unbinding? Precisely this Noble Eightfold Path: right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. This is the middle way realized by the Tathagata that — producing vision, producing knowledge — leads to calm, to direct knowledge, to self-awakening, to Unbinding.

“Now this, monks, is the noble truth of stress:[1] Birth is stressful, aging is stressful, death is stressful; sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are stressful; association with the unbeloved is stressful, separation from the loved is stressful, not getting what is wanted is stressful. In short, the five clinging-aggregates are stressful.

“And this, monks, is the noble truth of the origination of stress: the craving that makes for further becoming — accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now here & now there — i.e., craving for sensual pleasure, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming.

“And this, monks, is the noble truth of the cessation of stress: the remainderless fading & cessation, renunciation, relinquishment, release, & letting go of that very craving.

“And this, monks, is the noble truth of the way of practice leading to the cessation of stress: precisely this Noble Eightfold Path — right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

“Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before: ‘This is the noble truth of stress.’ Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before: ‘This noble truth of stress is to be comprehended.’ Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before:’ This noble truth of stress has been comprehended.’

“Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before: ‘This is the noble truth of the origination of stress’… ‘This noble truth of the origination of stress is to be abandoned’ [2] … ‘This noble truth of the origination of stress has been abandoned.’

“Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before: ‘This is the noble truth of the cessation of stress’… ‘This noble truth of the cessation of stress is to be directly experienced’… ‘This noble truth of the cessation of stress has been directly experienced.’

“Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before: ‘This is the noble truth of the way of practice leading to the cessation of stress’… ‘This noble truth of the way of practice leading to the cessation of stress is to be developed’… ‘This noble truth of the way of practice leading to the cessation of stress has been developed.’ [3]

“And, monks, as long as this — my three-round, twelve-permutation knowledge & vision concerning these four noble truths as they have come to be — was not pure, I did not claim to have directly awakened to the right self-awakening unexcelled in the cosmos with its deities, Maras, & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk. But as soon as this — my three-round, twelve-permutation knowledge & vision concerning these four noble truths as they have come to be — was truly pure, then I did claim to have directly awakened to the right self-awakening unexcelled in the cosmos with its deities, Maras & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk. Knowledge & vision arose in me: ‘Unprovoked is my release. This is the last birth. There is now no further becoming.'”

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the group of five monks delighted at his words. And while this explanation was being given, there arose to Ven. Kondañña the dustless, stainless Dhamma eye: Whatever is subject to origination is all subject to cessation.

And when the Blessed One had set the Wheel of Dhamma in motion, the earth devas cried out: “At Varanasi, in the Game Refuge at Isipatana, the Blessed One has set in motion the unexcelled Wheel of Dhamma that cannot be stopped by brahman or contemplative, deva, Mara or God or anyone in the cosmos.” On hearing the earth devas’ cry, the devas of the Four Kings’ Heaven took up the cry… the devas of the Thirty-three… the Yama devas… the Tusita devas… the Nimmanarati devas… the Paranimmita-vasavatti devas… the devas of Brahma’s retinue took up the cry: “At Varanasi, in the Game Refuge at Isipatana, the Blessed One has set in motion the unexcelled Wheel of Dhamma that cannot be stopped by brahman or contemplative, deva, Mara, or God or anyone at all in the cosmos.”

So in that moment, that instant, the cry shot right up to the Brahma worlds. And this ten-thousand fold cosmos shivered & quivered & quaked, while a great, measureless radiance appeared in the cosmos, surpassing the effulgence of the devas.

Then the Blessed One exclaimed: “So you really know, Kondañña? So you really know?” And that is how Ven. Kondañña acquired the name Añña-Kondañña — Kondañña who knows.

Courtesy of Access to Insight

Buddhism, Death & Rebirth, Philosophy, Society, Spirituality

Episode 42: Anatta-lakkhana Sutta — The Discourse on the Not-self Characteristic


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Thus I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was living at Benares, in the Deer Park at Isipatana (the Resort of Seers). There he addressed the bhikkhus of the group of five: “Bhikkhus.” — “Venerable sir,” they replied. The Blessed One said this.

“Bhikkhus, form is not-self. Were form self, then this form would not lead to affliction, and one could have it of form: ‘Let my form be thus, let my form be not thus.’ And since form is not-self, so it leads to affliction, and none can have it of form: ‘Let my form be thus, let my form be not thus.’

“Bhikkhus, feeling is not-self…

“Bhikkhus, perception is not-self…

“Bhikkhus, determinations are not-self…

“Bhikkhus, consciousness is not self. Were consciousness self, then this consciousness would not lead to affliction, and one could have it of consciousness: ‘Let my consciousness be thus, let my consciousness be not thus.’ And since consciousness is not-self, so it leads to affliction, and none can have it of consciousness: ‘Let my consciousness be thus, let my consciousness be not thus.’

“Bhikkhus, how do you conceive it: is form permanent or impermanent?” — “Impermanent, venerable Sir.” — “Now is what is impermanent painful or pleasant?” — “Painful, venerable Sir.” — “Now is what is impermanent, what is painful since subject to change, fit to be regarded thus: ‘This is mine, this is I, this is my self'”? — “No, venerable sir.”

“Is feeling permanent or impermanent?…

“Is perception permanent or impermanent?…

“Are determinations permanent or impermanent?…

“Is consciousness permanent or impermanent?” — “Impermanent, venerable sir.” — “Now is what is impermanent pleasant or painful?” — “Painful, venerable sir.” — “Now is what is impermanent, what is painful since subject to change, fit to be regarded thus: ‘This is mine, this is I, this is my self'”? — “No, venerable sir.”

“So, bhikkhus any kind of form whatever, whether past, future or presently arisen, whether gross or subtle, whether in oneself or external, whether inferior or superior, whether far or near, must with right understanding how it is, be regarded thus: ‘This is not mine, this is not I, this is not myself.’

“Any kind of feeling whatever…

“Any kind of perception whatever…

“Any kind of determination whatever…

“Any kind of consciousness whatever, whether past, future or presently arisen, whether gross or subtle, whether in oneself or external, whether inferior or superior, whether far or near must, with right understanding how it is, be regarded thus: ‘This is not mine, this is not I, this is not my self.’

“Bhikkhus, when a noble follower who has heard (the truth) sees thus, he finds estrangement in form, he finds estrangement in feeling, he finds estrangement in perception, he finds estrangement in determinations, he finds estrangement in consciousness.

“When he finds estrangement, passion fades out. With the fading of passion, he is liberated. When liberated, there is knowledge that he is liberated. He understands: ‘Birth is exhausted, the holy life has been lived out, what can be done is done, of this there is no more beyond.'”

That is what the Blessed One said. The bhikkhus were glad, and they approved his words.

Now during this utterance, the hearts of the bhikkhus of the group of five were liberated from taints through clinging no more.

Courtesy of Access to Insight

Death & Rebirth, Interview, Philosophy, Society, Spirituality

Episode 31: Near-Death & New Life Experience — Interview with Artisha Bolding


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I am always amazed by near-death experiences, because they are so prominent throughout all cultures and they really show what it means to be a human being on this plane. We all have different notions about what happens after death, and it is our right to explore this realm, because this is a fate that is inevitable for all of us. Here is what I have found, so far, about near-death experiences and experiences leading up to death:

  • The cultural background one is born into factors heavily in the experience; if somebody was raised a Christian, she is more likely to meet Jesus or see relatives in a “heaven” landscape. If the experiencer is from India, she may see Krishna or interpret the light as Brahman. This is also the case for many psychadelics/entheogens. The experiencer, dependent on her own individual make-up, will tend to have a trip to suit whatever makes up their mind’s experiences.
  • On a similar note, friends and family are often found to appear. The onlooker, a nurse or even living family members in the room with the dying person, are likely to pass these off as “hallucinations”, yet they are more-real-than-real to the dying. Strange sounds and frequencies, sights, and smells that are not normally sensed are presented to the dying — as are changes in behaviour that might seem strange to those familiar with the dying person.
  • Preparations for death are quite natural and normal. For example, The Tibetan Book of the Dead is a manual specifically laid out for a smooth journey to the other side so one is not bewildered and afraid of the death experience. The book even outlines the specific “hallucinations” and changes in behaviour, breath, body, speech, and actions of the dying so relatives and friends can ease them into the next and pretty foreign realm!

Along with these, the experiencer normally comes back with a new take on life and what they have been avoiding or not paying enough attention to. These can pull the person back on the right path and give them a whole new set of lungs! This is what happened to Artisha — I explain it as her spirit being reinvigorated and recharged to the illumination of the important while she is still in this physical body. And it’s really a blessing that she is still in this physical body, because she has used her near-death experience to make changes in her work life that spread into the world through media/broadcasting.

Meet Artisha at www.tboldmedia.com and feel free to contact her with your thoughts.

Anthony Chene Productions’ channel on Youtube is also an outstanding place to hear some amazing near-death experiences, presented in a clean and clear way.

Buddhism, Death & Rebirth, Guided Meditation, Hinduism / Sanatana Dharma, Philosophy, Society, Spirituality

Episode 24: Gentle Guided Meditation on Death


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What does death feel like? Surely, no one of us knows: but we have our imaginations to help us find out.

One of the four noble truths is that life is suffering (or dukkha), if it is taken wrongly. Almost all of us have a wrong view of both life and death, because they are mostly left unexplored due to intillectual fear. Liberation from fear can be achieved either slowly along a Buddhist path or rather quickly, as in the case of Pratyekabuddhas (or lone Buddhas) who awaken spontaneously and without effort. With a little patience and perseverance, awakening can be achieved, including the reminder that life is fragile, will end for all of us, and no one is immune to Samsara.

Along with the four noble truths, another truth that we can see very clearly is that all beings who ever have lived and who ever will live, will pass away. This can be explored before the big annhilation if we choose — and it is very healthy to ponder, contemplate, and wonder about truth. We don’t need excuses as to why “we shouldn’t look at that” or “we shouldn’t talk about that” or even “we shouldn’t think about that“.

If it is an experience of the human kingdom, either psychologically or societally, then it is fair playing ground to explore.

Depression has been explored… anxiety and a whole host of mental ailments are being explored… the expansion of consciousness through entheogenic plant medicines is explored… sexuality… personal identity… climbing the highest mountains and looking through the deepest jungles… so why not explore our own deaths along the way?

Often our deepest fears are rooted in habitual tendencies linked to negative experiences in the past or the unknown and intangible future.

Let’s explore these together, if they come up, in this gentle guided meditation on death.

May all beings be happy; may all beings be free from suffering. May all beings be peaceful; may all beings be free!

With love and gratitude for my life and yours,
Jnana B