Buddhism, Hinduism / Sanatana Dharma, Philosophy, Society, Spirituality

Episode 18: The Economy, Cities, & Our Big Brains – Part I

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What will happen in the future to jobs and the economy as people start to “wake up”?

Firstly, people who are awakening are more concerned with not only themselves and their immediate families and friends, but the wider scope: humanity as a whole.

As the population is growing — estimates of nearly 10 billion by 2050 — how are we to take care of each other in this new age we are entering? More and more graduates of top universities can’t get jobs, because the bar is raising and the sectors we are currently engaged in, in cities in particular, are becoming obsolete. Think about this: in my city alone, London, the top sector is finance and banking: according to uncsbrp.org:

”London’s economic importance cannot be underestimated. In terms of industries, it is the financial sector which is the most important. Although creative, media, technology and manufacturing industries all operate from London, it is the financial services sector which dominates them all. Most of the banking, underwriting and trading markets that operate in the capital are base in the City of London.”

How many people, out of the entire 9 million people who live in London, are in, or desire to be in banking? I’m not everyone, of course, but the majority of London is a cultural hub where over 250 languages are spoken and people have wide and diverse interests: East London’s creative scene is being overturned lately by developers, and many are scared for the future of their neighbourhood. London is a place that’s hard to leave, and you can find generations of families who have lived in the same neighbourhood their whole lives and masses of foreigners who came to the city 10, 20, 30 years ago and call it their home: that’s why you have what is called “Banglatown” in Shoreditch, Chinatown in the center, Jamaicans living in Brixton and Seven Sisters, Jewish areas in Stoke Newington and Stamford Hill, student centres in New Cross and Westminster and Aldgate, a smattering of schoolboys and girls everywhere, office workers, restaurant owners, pop-up shops and record stores, and a thousand other small businesses like tattoo shops, hair salons, music venues, and off-licenses. It’s not difficult to integrate with everyone, and that’s what makes London unique: we don’t all desire to follow the status quo, and we stay even though developers are taking land to create unaffordable housing and rents we’re up to our necks in heating bills, because you know, it’s never even really sunny… we are a collective, though segregated by smartphones and cliques and language barriers and busy-ness.

We don’t all want to be in banking…

(Tune in to hear the rest of the episode!)

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